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Agenda and minutes

Venue: Town Hall, Moorgate Street, Rotherham. S60 2TH

Contact: James McLaughlin, Head of Democratic Services  The webcast can be viewed at http://www.rotherham.public-i.tv

Items
No. Item

72.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

To consider any announcements by the Mayor in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 3(2)(ii).

Minutes:

The Mayor was pleased to present his activity since the last Council meeting which was attached for information to the Mayor’s letter.  In doing so he wished to draw particular attention to the parade and service he had attended to mark the Centenary of L/Cpr Thomas Norman Jackson receiving the Victoria Cross in Swinton and to the Rotherham Poppy Display available to view at the Centenary Market Hall until 17th November, 2018. 

 

The Mayor wished to pass on his thanks to all those involved in the events, showing Rotherham at its best, and invited everyone to join him in this year’s acts of Remembrance on the 11th November, 2018 and the celebration of 100 years since the end of the First World War.

73.

APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE

 

To receive the apologies of any Member who is unable to attend the meeting.

Minutes:

Apologies for absence were received from Councillors Alam, Beck, Clark, Cusworth, D. Cutts, Evans, Jepson, Tweed, Watson and Whysall.

74.

COMMUNICATIONS

 

Any communication received by the Mayor or Chief Executive which relates to a recommendation of the Cabinet or a committee which was received after the relevant meeting.

Minutes:

There were no communications received.

75.

MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS COUNCIL MEETING pdf icon PDF 184 KB

 

To receive the record of proceedings of the ordinary meeting of the Council held on 5th September, 2018 and to approve the accuracy thereof.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved:-  That the minutes of the meeting of Council held on 5th September, 2018, be approved for signature by the Mayor.

 

Mover:-  Councillor Read                       Seconder:-  Councillor Lelliott

76.

PETITIONS

 

To report on any petitions received by the Council received by the Council and receive statements in support of petitions in accordance with Petitions Scheme and Council Procedure Rule 13.

Minutes:

The Mayor reported receipt of a petition, which had not met the threshold for consideration by Council, and would be referred to the relevant directorate for a response to be prepared:-

 

·           From 41 residents calling on the Council to consider reducing the speed of traffic cutting through Nickerwood Drive, Aston since the installation of traffic calming measures on The Chase and Lodge Lane which may in turn reduce the volume.

 

Councillor Taylor addressed the Council as part of the presentation of the petition.

77.

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

To invite Councillors to declare any disclosable pecuniary interests or personal interests they may have in any matter which is to be considered at this meeting, to confirm the nature of those interests and whether they intend to leave the meeting for the consideration of the item.

Minutes:

The Mayor of Rotherham (Councillor Alan Buckley); Councillors Albiston, Allcock, Allen, Andrews, Atkin, Beaumont, Bird, Brookes, Cooksey, Elliot, M. Elliott, Ellis, Fenwick-Green, Hoddinott, Ireland, Jarvis, Jones, Keenan, Khan, Lelliott, McNeely, Mallinder, Marles, Napper, Pitchley, Price, Read, Roche, Rushforth, Russell, Sansome, Senior, Sheppard, Steele, Taylor, Vjestica, Walsh, Williams, Wilson, Wyatt and Yasseen declared personal interests in Minute No. 85 on the grounds of being members of a Trade Union.

78.

PUBLIC QUESTIONS

 

To receive questions from members of the public who may wish to ask a general question of the Mayor, Cabinet Member or the Chairman of a Committee in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 12.

Minutes:

(1)  Mr. S. Ball was unable to attend today’s meeting so his question would be answered in writing.

 

(2)   Mr. P. Thirlwallasked could the Leader tell him who was responsible for ensuring that Councillors complied with the ‘Code of Conduct’ and explain what actions were taken when Councillors were found to be in breach of the code?

 

The Leader confirmed that the responsibility for complying with the Code of Conduct rested with the individual Councillors. 

 

Where a Councillor was found to be in breach of the Code of Conduct the options available to the Standards and Ethics Sub-Committee were:-

 

(1)     Censure or reprimand the Councillor.

(2)     Publish its findings in respect of the Councillor’s conduct.

(3)     Report its findings to Council [or to the respective Parish/Town Council if appropriate], for information.

(4)     Recommend to the Councillor’s Group Leader (or in the case of ungrouped Councillors, recommend to Council or to Committees) that he/she be removed from any or all Committees or Sub-Committees of the Council.

(5)     Recommend that the Councillor be removed from the Cabinet, or be removed from particular Portfolio responsibilities.

(6)     Instruct the Monitoring Officer to [or recommend that the Parish/Town Council] arrange training for the Councillor.

(7)     Remove [or recommend to the Parish/Town Council that it removes] the Councillor from all outside appointments to which he/she has been appointed or nominated by the Council [or by the Parish/Town Council].

(8)     Withdraw [or recommend to the Parish/Town Council that it withdraws] facilities provided to the Councillor by the Council, such as a computer, website and/or email and Internet access.

(9)     Exclude [or recommend that the Parish Council exclude] the Councillor from the Council’s offices or other premises, with the exception of meeting rooms as necessary for attending Council, Committee and Sub-Committee meetings.

 

The Localism Act 2011 abolished much of the standards system for Councillors including Councils’ powers to suspend Councillors from their duties and the power to refer more serious cases to the First Tier Tribunal, which had the power to suspend for longer periods and to disqualify Councillors.  This had severely limited the sanctions available to Councils when dealing with Councillor who have breached the Code of Conduct.

 

In a supplementary question Mr. Thirlwall pointed out that the failure to comply with the register of interests within twenty-eight days of being elected was a criminal offence with a £5,000 fine and the said Councillor could be barred from standing for elected office.

 

He went on to point out that Councillor Cowles received £8,000 for being the Leader of the Opposition, however, ten of the thirteen UKIP Councillors had not completed the register of interests properly, eight of those Members had not listed their membership of the UKIP political party and two had left their register completely blank.

 

The Labour Party had not fared much better.  Seven Labour Members had not listed their Labour membership, one was a Cabinet Member, one a Chair of a Committee and one claimed to own their own house.  This was  ...  view the full minutes text for item 78.

79.

EXCLUSION OF THE PRESS AND PUBLIC

 

Should it be necessary, in the opinion of the Mayor, to consider excluding the press and public from the meeting in relation to any items of urgent business on the grounds that private information is likely to be divulged.

 

There are no such items at the time of preparing this agenda.

Minutes:

Resolved:-  That under Section 100(A) of the Local Government Act 1972, that should the Mayor deem if necessary the public be excluded from the meeting on the grounds that any items involve the likely disclosure of exempt information as defined in the paragraphs of Part 1 of schedule 12(A) of such Act indicated, as now amended by the Local Government (Access to information) (Variation) Order 2006.

80.

LEADER OF THE COUNCIL'S STATEMENT

 

To receive a statement from the Leader of the Council in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 9.

Minutes:

The Leader of the Council was pleased to congratulate Rahul Mandal from Rotherham on his successful win on the Great British Bake Off.

 

He also reported the departure of the Government-appointed Commissioners from Rotherham following the announcement by the Secretary of State for the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government made on 18th September to reinstate decision making to democratically elected councillors as of 24th September, 2018.

 

It was testimony to the dedication and resilience that all Members, Commissioners, officers and partners have demonstrated that had played a big role in bringing Commissioner involvement to an early conclusion and to make progress.  This was the beginning and the Council should continue to have high standards with more to do.

 

Given that the Commissioners have left early the Council would undertake a ‘Health Check’ in February, 2019 to ensure that progress was continuing.

 

There have also been a number of boosts to the town over recent weeks in relation to regeneration and economic development with a national first and significant boost to the town’s infrastructure with the launch of the Tram Train increasing connectivity between Rotherham and Sheffield.

 

Works commissioned by South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive (SYPTE) had also reached the highest point of the refurbishment of Rotherham Interchange, as building contractors, Interserve, hit the halfway mark of the contract programme.

 

In addition, the first Rother Living show homes opened on Saturday, 13th October, 2018off Braithwell Road, Maltby as part of the latest major housing development from the Council, offering high quality and affordable homes in the Borough. The Northgate development was part of a £29 million investment to construct new properties at a number of sites across the Borough, with a mixture of houses for sale, rent and shared ownership.

 

The Leader also drew attention to the recent verdicts resulting in twenty-one guilty accounts against seven defendants for Operation Stovewood.  This was good news for all concerned and the Leader wished to place on record his thanks to professionals, the National Crime Agency and support staff who made this possible and again paid tribute to survivors and their families who continued to inspire with their determination and dedication.

 

Questions not exceeding ten minutes were invited from Members of the Council.

 

Councillor Carter made reference to the Tram Train, which was a good result for Rotherham and South Yorkshire as a whole, and asked, providing the teething issues got ironed out, would the Council be pushing for further expansion of the Tram Train throughout South Yorkshire.

 

The Leader confirmed there were no plans at this stage.  The initial idea was for a two year trial given that the technology was still in testing.  He advised there was a piece of work under the guise of Sheffield City Region for rail connectivety more widely across South Yorkshire and he had urged the Mayor of the City Region to given consideration to Tram Train improvements.  With the short term progress and if the technology worked well there should  ...  view the full minutes text for item 80.

81.

MINUTES OF THE FORMER CABINET AND COMMISSIONERS' DECISION MAKING MEETING pdf icon PDF 104 KB

 

To note the minutes of the former Cabinet and Commissioners’ Decision Making Meeting held on 17 September 2018.

Minutes:

Resolved:-  That the reports, recommendations and minutes of the meeting of the former Cabinet/Commissioners’ Decision Making Meeting held on 17th September, 2018, be received.

 

Mover:-  Councillor Read                       Seconder:-  Councillor Lelliott

82.

RESPONSE TO OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY RECOMMENDATIONS - USE OF INTERIM, AGENCY AND CONSULTANCY STAFF pdf icon PDF 116 KB

 

To note the response of the Cabinet to recommendations from Overview and Scrutiny Management Board in respect of the use of interim, agency and consultancy staff.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Further to Minute No. 92(5) of the meeting of the Overview and Scrutiny Management Board on 17th February, 2017, a cross-party review had taken place to seek assurance that the Council measured performance and value for money in its use of agency staff and consultants and was taking appropriate action to maintain spend within acceptable limits.  The group completed its review in the summer of 2017 and submitted a final report to Cabinet on 17th September, 2018.

 

Under the Overview and Scrutiny Procedure Rules, the Cabinet was required to respond to any recommendations made by Scrutiny. All of the recommendations from the Overview and Scrutiny Management Board were formally accepted by the Cabinet. The recommendations from scrutiny were welcomed and contributed to the ongoing strengthening of arrangements to manage the use of agency, interim and consultancy staff by the Council.

 

This report was, therefore, submitted to ensure that all Members were aware of the implementation of recommendations from the review.

 

The Chair of the Overview and Scrutiny Management Board placed on record his thanks to the Cabinet, Members involved and relevant officers for their involvement in the review.

 

Resolved:-  That the Cabinet’s response to the scrutiny review on the use of Agency, Interim and Consultancy Staff, set out at Appendix A to the report submitted, be noted.

 

Mover:-  Councillor Allen                        Seconder:-  Councillor Read

83.

RECOMMENDATIONS FROM OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY - ADULT RESIDENTIAL AND NURSING CARE HOMES pdf icon PDF 98 KB

 

To note recommendations from the Health Select Commission following a workshop into adult residential and nursing care homes.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Consideration was given to the report which presented the findings of a scrutiny workshop undertaken by the Health Select Commission to consider residential and nursing care home for adults aged over 65.  The purpose of the workshop was to consider progress in bringing about improvements to safety, quality and effectiveness in the sector.  It was also an opportunity to explore the impact of the Care Home Support Service as the care home sector was one of the transformation initiatives under the Rotherham Integrated Health and Social Care Place Plan, a significant part of the Select Commission’s work programme.  The conclusions and recommendations made by Members were based on information gathered from the workshop and examination of related documentation.

 

Following consideration by the Council, the Cabinet would be required to respond formally to the four recommendations and indicate agreement or otherwise, what action would be taken to implement the recommendations, along with details of timescales and accountabilities.

 

Resolved:-  (1)  That the report and recommendations from the scrutiny workshop on adult residential and nursing care homes, be noted.

 

(2)             That the response of Cabinet to the recommendations be fed back to the Health Select Commission.

 

Mover:-  Councillor Short                       Seconder:-  Councillor Jarvis

84.

RECOMMENDATION FROM STANDARDS & ETHICS SUB-COMMITTEE - OUTSIDE APPOINTMENTS - COUNCILLOR BRIAN CUTTS pdf icon PDF 118 KB

 

To consider recommendations from the Standards and Ethics Sub-Committee in respect of Councillor Brian Cutts’ appointments to serve on outside bodies on behalf of the Council.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Further to a meeting of the Standards and Ethics Sub-Committee held on 14th September, 2018, consideration was given to the outcome of complaints about the conduct of Councillor Brian Cutts.  The Sub-Committee found that Councillor Brian Cutts’ conduct at a pre-meeting of the Improving Lives Select Commission had been in breach of the Council’s Code of Conduct for Members and Co-opted Members.  The decision of the Sub-Committee included a recommendation to Council that Councillor Brian Cutts be removed from all outside appointments to which he has been appointed or nominated by the Council.  Councillor Brian Cutts was a member of the South Yorkshire Police and Crime Panel. 

 

A number of Councillors spoke on the matter and expressed their personal views:-

 

Councillor John Turner was of the view that free speech had been damaged, gave examples of how contentious same sex issues were globally and did not feel that the comments made by Councillor Brian Cutts was unreasonable.

 

Councillor R. Elliott disagreed with Councillor Brian Cutts’ comments about fostering and some of his views previously, but had always been open to a healthy discussion and believed he had never used derogatory language.  Councillor Cutts was a hard working individual who was passionate about Rotherham’s residents.  He believed a Member was entitled to their opinion even if the majority may disagree.

 

Councillor M. Elliott too disagreed with Councillor Cutts’ comments and distanced himself from the reported comments made.  As a member of the Fostering Panel he understood the in-depth stringent lengthy assessment process for prospective foster carers, couples and individuals regardless of their sexuality orientation.  However, he believed in the freedom of speech which supported the freedom of an individual to articulate their views and feelings publically without fear of retaliation, censorship or punishment.  Councillor Cutts was a conscientious hard working Councillor and to remove him as a member of the South Yorkshire Police and Crime Panel was understandable, but from any other meeting was a step too far.

 

Councillor Hoddinott spoke of the important role of the Police and Crime Panel and the tackling of hate crime, which was on the increase, a priority for the Council and partners.  Hate speech, including homophobic comments, was not acceptable and the effect of hurtful comments should not be under estimated on friends and family too.  With free speech came responsibility as an elected representative to everyone in Rotherham.

 

Councillor Walsh made reference to the various sexuality orientations and how this was part of human life.  Homophobic attitudes were irrational and not a freedom of speech and as such were the height of bad manners.

 

Councillor Roche was concerned about the increasing negative and adverse comments made in public and on social media.   Councillor Cutts may use his right of free speech, but must accept the consequences of his actions and the impact of the comments on other people.

 

The Leader considered it sad that in 2018 the Council were discussing a report about gender equality and sexual orientation and whether a member  ...  view the full minutes text for item 84.

85.

NOTICE OF MOTION -TUC'S GREAT JOBS AGENDA

 

This council notes that:-

 

               Insecure work includes people working on zero-hours contracts, temporary and agency work, and low-paid self-employment.

               3.5 million people could be in insecure work by start of 2022 if current trends continue - a rise of 290,000. That’s the equivalent of the entire working population of Sheffield.

               Workers on zero-hours and short-hours contracts earn a third less per hour than the average worker.

               1 in 13 Black, Asian and minority ethnic employees are in insecure jobs, compared to 1 in 20 white employees.

               Insecure work costs the Treasury £4 billion a year in lost income tax and national insurance contributions, along with extra benefits and tax credits.

 

This council further notes that:-

 

               UK workers are still on average £38 a week worse off than before the crash in 2008 (figures to April 2017). This is the longest squeeze on pay since Victorian times.

               Public sector workers’ real wages are down thousands of pounds a year compared to 2010. For example, prison officers and paramedics are all down over £3,800 a year. Firefighters are down nearly £2,900, while teachers are down approximately £2,500.

               Just one in three people (33%) people say their employer offers regular training opportunities - and one in four workers (24%) say that no training is offered at their workplace at all apart from a new starters’ induction.

               More than a million workers suffer from ill-health related to their employment, and around 23 million working days are lost each year due to injury or illness in the workplace.

               Almost one in three workers have been bullied in the workplace.

               More than a third (37%) of Black and minority ethnic workers have been bullied, abused or singled out at work.

               More than half (52%) of women and nearly two-thirds (63%) of women aged 18-24 years old have experienced sexual harassment at work.

 

This council believes that:-

 

               Every job should be a secure and great job. That means every worker must be paid fairly; work in a safe and healthy workplace; be treated decently and with respect; have guaranteed hours; have the chance to be represented by unions and be consulted on what matters at work; have the chance to get on in life.

               Currently, too many jobs in the UK aren’t great jobs – and too many people feel that great jobs aren’t available where they live. 

               It is positive that there is now a public debate about how we improve jobs in the UK – much of it driven by union campaigning and legal action against bad employers like Sports Direct, Uber and Hermes.

               The TUC have been clear that the proposals put forward by Mathew Taylor’s review of employment standards for the government are inadequate.

 

This council resolves to:-

 

               Support the TUC’s Great Jobs Agenda, which sets out the actions employers and the government must take for every job to be a great job, and tell the  ...  view the full agenda text for item 85.

Minutes:

Proposed by Councillor Steele and seconded by Councillor Rose Keenan:-

 

This Council notes that:-

 

               Insecure work includes people working on zero-hours contracts, temporary and agency work, and low-paid self-employment.

               3.5 million people could be in insecure work by start of 2022 if current trends continue - a rise of 290,000. That’s the equivalent of the entire working population of Sheffield.

               Workers on zero-hours and short-hours contracts earn a third less per hour than the average worker.

               1 in 13 Black, Asian and minority ethnic employees are in insecure jobs, compared to 1 in 20 white employees.

               Insecure work costs the Treasury £4 billion a year in lost income tax and national insurance contributions, along with extra benefits and tax credits.

 

This Council further notes that:-

 

               UK workers are still on average £38 a week worse off than before the crash in 2008 (figures to April 2017). This is the longest squeeze on pay since Victorian times.

               Public sector workers’ real wages are down thousands of pounds a year compared to 2010. For example, prison officers and paramedics are all down over £3,800 a year. Firefighters are down nearly £2,900, while teachers are down approximately £2,500.

               Just one in three people (33%) people say their employer offers regular training opportunities - and one in four workers (24%) say that no training is offered at their workplace at all apart from a new starters’ induction.

               More than a million workers suffer from ill-health related to their employment, and around 23 million working days are lost each year due to injury or illness in the workplace.

               Almost one in three workers have been bullied in the workplace.

               More than a third (37%) of Black and minority ethnic workers have been bullied, abused or singled out at work.

               More than half (52%) of women and nearly two-thirds (63%) of women aged 18-24 years old have experienced sexual harassment at work.

 

This Council believes that:-

 

               Every job should be a secure and great job. That means every worker must be paid fairly; work in a safe and healthy workplace; be treated decently and with respect; have guaranteed hours; have the chance to be represented by unions and be consulted on what matters at work; have the chance to get on in life.

               Currently, too many jobs in the UK aren’t great jobs – and too many people feel that great jobs aren’t available where they live. 

               It is positive that there is now a public debate about how we improve jobs in the UK – much of it driven by union campaigning and legal action against bad employers like Sports Direct, Uber and Hermes.

               The TUC have been clear that the proposals put forward by Mathew Taylor’s review of employment standards for the government are inadequate.

 

This Council resolves to:-

 

               Support the TUC’s Great Jobs Agenda, which sets out the actions employers and the government must take for  ...  view the full minutes text for item 85.

86.

NOTICE OF MOTION - FOSTERING

This Council recognises:-

 

1.    The invaluable role of foster carers and families, caring for, nurturing and loving children who for any reason cannot be with their biological families.

2.    As corporate parents to those children, we owe a debt of gratitude to those 171 foster carers – including three same sex families – currently caring for 190 children (in October 2018).

3.    That foster families will often go on to become adoptive “forever” families. Indeed more than 100 children in the borough have been living with the same foster families for more than two years.

4.    That individuals and families have the right to be treated equally before the law when they apply to become a foster parent, irrespective of their background, sexuality, ethnic origin, marital status or other protected characteristic. A good foster parent is a good foster parent.

5.    That according to the government-backed website, Fosterline; “In 2010, The Centre for Family Research at the University of Cambridge conducted interviews for Stonewall with 82 children and young people who have lesbian, gay or bisexual parents to learn more about their experiences both at home and at school. The study found that:

·         Very young children with gay parents tend not to see their families as being any different to those of their peers.

·         Many of the older children said they saw their families as special and different, but only because all families are special and different – though some felt that their families were a lot closer than other people’s families.

·         Children with gay parents like having gay parents and would not want things to change, but that sometimes they wish that other people were more accepting.”

6.    That 277 children from Rotherham are currently placed with Independent Fostering Agencies, often outside the borough, many of whom would benefit from fostering and adoptive families here in Rotherham right now.

 

This Council resolves:-

 

1.    To thank all the foster families who make a difference in the lives of children in the council’s care.

2.    To send a clear message: that we need more foster families for our children, and that we welcome applications from residents of all backgrounds and ages; men and women; black, white or Asian; gay or straight; of all religious backgrounds and none; married, unmarried or single.

3.    To support efforts to recruit more foster carers and adoptive families in order to fulfil our objective of giving every child the best start in life.

 

Mover:-  Councillor                          Seconder:-  Councillor

 

Minutes:

Proposed by Councillor Read and seconded by Councillor Elliot:-

 

This Council recognises:-

 

1.         The invaluable role of foster carers and families, caring for, nurturing and loving children who for any reason cannot be with their biological families.

2.         As corporate parents to those children, we owe a debt of gratitude to those 171 foster carers – including three same sex families – currently caring for 190 children (in October 2018).

3.         That foster families will often go on to become adoptive “forever” families. Indeed more than 100 children in the borough have been living with the same foster families for more than two years.

4.         That individuals and families have the right to be treated equally before the law when they apply to become a foster parent, irrespective of their background, sexuality, ethnic origin, marital status or other protected characteristic. A good foster parent is a good foster parent.

5.         That according to the government-backed website, Fosterline; “In 2010, The Centre for Family Research at the University of Cambridge conducted interviews for Stonewall with 82 children and young people who have lesbian, gay or bisexual parents to learn more about their experiences both at home and at school. The study found that:-

 

·                Very young children with gay parents tend not to see their families as being any different to those of their peers.

·                Many of the older children said they saw their families as special and different, but only because all families are special and different – though some felt that their families were a lot closer than other people’s families.

·                Children with gay parents like having gay parents and would not want things to change, but that sometimes they wish that other people were more accepting.”

 

6.         That 277 children from Rotherham are currently placed with Independent Fostering Agencies, often outside the borough, many of whom would benefit from fostering and adoptive families here in Rotherham right now.

 

This Council resolves:-

 

1.         To thank all the foster families who make a difference in the lives of children in the council’s care.

 

2.         To send a clear message: that we need more foster families for our children, and that we welcome applications from residents of all backgrounds and ages; men and women; black, white or Asian; gay or straight; of all religious backgrounds and none; married, unmarried or single.

 

3.         To support efforts to recruit more foster carers and adoptive families in order to fulfil our objective of giving every child the best start in life.

 

On being put to the vote, the motion was carried unanimously.

87.

MEMBERSHIP OF BOARDS, COMMITTEES AND PANELS

 

To approve the following changes to the membership of committees, boards and panels:-

 

Committee, Board or Panel

Outgoing Member

New Appointment

Standards and Ethics Committee

Councillor Brookes

Councillor Pitchley

Planning Board (Substitute)

Vacant

Councillor Short

 

Minutes:

Further to Minute No. 190 of the meeting of Council held on 23rd May, 2018, consideration was given to the following proposed changes to the membership of Committees, Boards and Panels:-

 

Committee, Board or Panel

 

Outgoing Member

 

New Appointment

 

Standards and Ethics Committee

 

Councillor Brookes

Councillor Pitchley

 

Planning Board (Substitute)

Vacant

Councillor Short

South Yorkshire Police and Crime Panel

Councillor B. Cutts

Councillor Short

 

Resolved:-  That the appointments be approved.

 

Mover:-  Councillor Read                           Seconder:  Councillor Lelliott

88.

STANDARDS AND ETHICS COMMITTEE pdf icon PDF 67 KB

 

To receive and consider reports, minutes and recommendations of the Standards and Ethics Committee.

 

To confirm the minutes as a true record.

Minutes:

Resolved:-  That the reports, recommendations and minutes of the meeting of the Standards and Ethics Committee be adopted.

 

Mover:-  Councillor McNeely                  Seconder:-  Councillor Vjestica

89.

AUDIT COMMITTEE pdf icon PDF 85 KB

 

To receive and consider reports, minutes and recommendations of the Audit Committee.

 

To confirm the minutes as a true record.

Minutes:

Resolved:-  That the reports, recommendation and minutes of the meeting of the Audit Committee be adopted.

 

Mover:-  Councillor Wyatt                           Seconder:-  Councillor Walsh

90.

HEALTH AND WELLBEING BOARD pdf icon PDF 119 KB

 

To receive and consider reports, minutes and recommendations of the Health and Wellbeing Board.

 

To confirm the minutes as a true record.

Minutes:

Resolved:-  That the reports, recommendation and minutes of the meeting of the Health and Wellbeing Board be adopted.

 

Mover:-  Councillor Roche                         Seconder:-  Councillor Mallinder

 

91.

PLANNING BOARD pdf icon PDF 62 KB

 

To receive and consider reports, minutes and recommendations of the Planning Board.

 

To confirm the minutes as a true record.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved:-  That the reports, recommendation and minutes of the meeting of the Planning Board be adopted.

 

Mover:-  Councillor Sheppard                   Seconder:-  Councillor Williams

 

92.

LICENSING pdf icon PDF 70 KB

 

To receive and consider reports, minutes and recommendations of the Licensing Sub-Committee and Licensing Board Sub-Committee.

 

To confirm the minutes as a true record.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved:-  That the reports, recommendation and minutes of the meeting of the Licensing Sub-Committee and Licensing Board Sub-Committee be adopted.

 

Mover:-  Councillor Ellis                             Seconder:-  Councillor Beaumont

 

93.

SHEFFIELD CITY REGION COMBINED AUTHORITY pdf icon PDF 107 KB

 

To receive the minutes of the Sheffield City Region Combined Authority.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Consideration was given to the minutes of the Sheffield City Region Combined Authority and the Leader provided a quarterly update on activity for:-

 

·             Local Growth Fund which was the main source of funding for Council projects.  The project spend profile had been approved which risked the City Region losing some of the funding allocation if targets were not met.  Additional overspend over programming had been approved and as a result Rotherham had won funding for an extension for the incubation centre at Manvers with a grant of £1.6m.  Timelines were still tight and the logistics were still being worked through.

 

·             Rotherham’s performance on the Employment Support Pilot which had seen 471 referrals being received.  Only Sheffield had more people taking part in South Yorkshire.

 

·             Housing business case had been submitted for the modern methods of construction pilot exploring how the City Region could close the viability gap for housing schemes.

 

Resolved:-  That the minutes of the meeting of the South Yorkshire Combined Authority be received.

 

Mover:-  Councillor Read                       Seconder:-  Councillor Lelliott

94.

SOUTH YORKSHIRE FIRE AND RESCUE AUTHORITY pdf icon PDF 113 KB

 

To receive the minutes of the South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Authority.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Consideration was given to the minutes of the South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Authority.  Councillor Atkin provided an update on activity and confirmed:-

 

·             A further meeting where the Annual Report was agreed.

·             Month by month description of works undertaken by the Fire Authority and the Fire Brigade.

·             Link to video footage about the work of the Fire and Rescue Authority.

·             A video for National Women’s Day which was well received across the sector.  This had now won several awards – copies to be circulated.

 

Resolved:-  That the minutes of the meeting of the South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Authority be received.

 

Mover:-  Councillor Atkin                        Seconder:-  Councillor Taylor

95.

SOUTH YORKSHIRE PENSIONS AUTHORITY pdf icon PDF 101 KB

 

To receive the minutes of the South Yorkshire Pensions Authority.

Minutes:

Consideration was given to the minutes of the meeting of the South Yorkshire Pensions Authority and Councillor Ellis provided an update on activity confirming:-

 

·                A report received from the Audit Committee and its function in the annual report provided reassurance in good governance in the Authority.

·                A report received setting out various immediate and longer term changes to the Authority’s governance arrangements.

 

Resolved:-  That the minutes of the meeting of the South Yorkshire Pensions Authority be received.

 

Mover:-  Councillor Ellis                             Seconder:-  Councillor Wyatt

96.

SOUTH YORKSHIRE POLICE AND CRIME PANEL pdf icon PDF 111 KB

 

To receive the minutes of the South Yorkshire Police and Crime Panel.

Minutes:

Consideration was given to the minutes of the meeting of the South Yorkshire Police and Crime Panel and Councillor Sansome provided an update on activity confirming receipt of briefing paper on the impact of Neighbourhood Policing on South Yorkshire outcomes.

 

Resolved:-  That the minutes of the meeting of the South Yorkshire Police and Crime Panel be received.

 

Mover:-  Councillor Sansome                 Seconder:-  Councillor Hoddinott

97.

MEMBERS' QUESTIONS TO DESIGNATED SPOKESPERSONS

 

To put questions, if any, to the designated Members on the discharge of functions of the South Yorkshire Police and Crime Panel, South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Authority, Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield Combined Authority and South Yorkshire Pensions Authority, in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 11(5).

Minutes:

(1)  Councillor R. Elliott asked why did Councillor Atkin not lobby for the reinstatement of the second pump at the recent Fire Authority Budget Meeting.

 

Councillor Atkin stated that the Council had made clear its view that it would wish to see the second appliance restored and his Fire Authority colleagues were in no doubt about that.

 

However, the latest financial report presented to the Fire Authority had showed the Service achieving a relatively small underspend of £600k on an annual budget of £50m. In presenting this report to Members the Director of Support Services outlined significant financial risks facing the service. These included:-

 

·                The requirement to save £1.4 million from the Service’s annual budget, following the outcome of a Judicial Review relating to the Close Proximity Crewing duty system.

 

·                The outcome of a Government pensions revaluation, which would almost certainly mean a sharp rise in employer pension contributions.

 

·                Substantial legal costs and detriment claims for staff displaced because of Close Proximity Crewing, which were not yet known and would have to be met from the current year’s underspend

 

It was as a result of these factors that the Fire Authority agreed earlier this year that the Service should begin the process of developing a revised Integrated Risk Management Plan, which would consider its future Service provision (including fire cover) in line with the money available to it.  It was as part of this process that the Fire Authority would consider whether the resources were available to restore the second appliance.

 

In a supplementary question Councillor Elliott welcomed the glimmer of hope relating to the restoration of the second appliance.  When the motion requesting reinstatement was amended Councillor Elliott knew it was a fudge, but he would not let the situation drop despite numerous answers and excuses given to his questions since.  Twelve new recruits had been appointed and a further twelve were in training and more to follow and fire fighters in Rotherham had offered to work overtime whilst the new recruits were in place so to enable the second pump and to keep residents safe at night. 

 

There were questions about money that was spare and Councillor Atkin had previously said there was £5 million whereas the Fire Chief at the Scrutiny meeting said they were £10 million.  Again inconsistencies in information.  If the money was there and staff were there when would the second pump be reinstated.

 

Councillor Atkin confirmed twelve new fire fighters had been recruited and a further twelve were in training, but they had been recruited to replace those lost to retirement. Approximately, twenty fire fighters retired each year and each time someone retired it was the plan to replace them.

 

(2)  Councillor R. Elliott asked did South Yorkshire residents suffer from a lack of attention by South Yorkshire Fire Authority when it set up a now failed company and spent thousands on a company credit card.

 

Councillor Atkin advised that Safety Solutions UK Ltd was set up by the Fire Authority in  ...  view the full minutes text for item 97.

98.

MEMBERS' QUESTIONS TO CABINET MEMBERS AND CHAIRMEN

 

To put questions, if any, to Cabinet Members and Chairmen (or their representatives) under Council Procedure Rules 11(1) and 11(3).

Minutes:

(1)  Councillor Hague asked what was the financial cost of recruiting a Strategic Director?

 

The Leader confirmed the cost of recruitment would vary depending upon the methods of recruitment that was used. On average the cost for recruiting a Strategic Director was around £20k and the cost of the recruitment would be met through the savings identified by the substantive post being vacant for at least four months.

 

In a supplementary question Councillor Hague, given that Regeneration and Environment had now lost its Strategic Director and were faced with the process of recruiting another, asked for assurance that the exciting projects for that Directorate would have no detrimental impact through delays or cost implications for those projects.

 

The Leader was not aware of any additional costs or delays being brought to his attention.  Paul Woodcock, Assistant Director, was acting up in that senior role and was receiving the Council’s support in doing so.

 

(2)  Councillor Carter would receive an answer to his question in writing.

 

(3)  Councillor Hague asked was it common practice for Cabinet Members to make formal complaints against Council Officers?

 

The Leader of the Council replied no it was not common, but it did happen from time to time because one of the key roles of Cabinet Members was to act on behalf of the public to hold officers to account for the delivery of policies and priorities.

 

If there were instances where any Member of this Council felt an officer had not performed their function in the right way, in line with the policies of the Council or misled a Member or in any way believed they had acted detrimentally to the public, then they would have support to follow due process set out in the Member/Officer Protocol.

 

In a supplementary question Councillor Hague confirmed he was aware of complaints being made against officers and it had been made clear to him that certain departments were living in fear and anxiety of the consequences of some of the actions they had to take.  He asked how did the Leader intend to deal with these officer concerns.

 

The Leader was not aware of these concerns, but if there were staff members who were concerned or anxious they should escalate these concerns to management in due course and in turn raise those concerns with the Chief Executive.  The Council had a Whistleblowing Policy in place and he was assured that where there were concerns for staff and where there were complaints, proper robust procedures were in place to ensure they were fully investigated and appropriate action taken.

 

Certainly with reference to recent changes in senior management the Leader was assured that appropriate procedures were followed and appropriate action taken in the way it was hoped they would be.

 

(4)  Councillor Carter asked what action had been taken by RMBC since the Council passed an anti-fracking motion to disassociate RMBC from fracking?

 

Councillor Lelliott confirmed that at  the Council Meeting on the 18th October, 2017  the following was agreed  ...  view the full minutes text for item 98.

99.

URGENT ITEMS

 

Any other public items which the Mayor determines are urgent.

Minutes:

There were none.